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Independent Study

If a student will be away from the classroom for at least 5 days, an Independent Study Contract can be arranged through the front office.

This contract provides students with lessons/activities to complete while away from the classroom so they do not fall behind in their studies.  

To request an Independent Study Contract, the following procedures are necessary:

  • A telephone call, email, or note from the parent must be received at least 5 days prior to the student’s first day away from the classroom.
  • The student must be gone for a minimum of 5 school days, but no more than 10 school days.  (More than 10 school days requires written permission which must be authorized by a school administrator).
  • The parent is responsible for picking up the contract from our attendance clerk, Ela Deykes.
  • The first school day after the ending date of the Independent Study Contract, the student/parent must turn in all homework to the teacher. This is for auditing purposes by the state. 

If these procedures are not followed, the contract becomes invalid.

Please contact the Attendance Clerk, Ela Deykes at (949) 454-1590 to arrange an Independent Study Contract.

Attendance Matters

Attendance Matters

WHY DOES ATTENDANCE MATTER?

 

Attendance Matters (Website)

  • The attendance rate is important because students are more likely to succeed in academics when they attend school consistently. It's difficult for the teacher and the class to build their skills and progress if a large number of students are frequently absent.
  • It helps us build opinions and have points of view on things in life. People debate over the subject of whether education is the only thing that gives knowledge. Some say education is the process of gaining information about the surrounding world while knowledge is something very different. They are right.
  • School budgets may suffer when students don’t attend. In many states, school budgets are based on the average daily attendance at a school. If many students enrolled at a school fail to consistently attend, the school has less money to pay for essential classroom needs.
  • In addition to falling behind in academics, students who are not in school on a regular basis are more likely to get into trouble with the law and cause problems in their communities.

A 2008 study conducted by the Rodel Community Scholars at Arizona State University that tracked students from kindergarten through high school found that dropout patterns were linked with poor attendance, beginning in kindergarten. Gregory Hickman, director of the Rodel Community Scholars program and former director of the Arizona Dropout Initiative, notes they discovered that as early as kindergarten, behavioral differences are apparent between those who go on to graduate and those who drop out, with dropouts missing an average of 124 days by eighth grade.

You can find helpful tips on developing positive attendance patterns for your children and resources for parents here.